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Te Tiriti-based futures + Anti-racism is innovative (inter)national, online and offline, Te Tiriti-based, anti-racism and decolonisation. The  event has now been run three times: in March 2020, 2022 and 2024. An incredible line up of speakers and leaders have come together to discuss topics including institutional racism and anti-racism, decolonisation, building Te Tiriti-based futures and transforming our constitution.

Friday 22nd March was a platform for emerging voices called:

Kei te mura o te ahi. Marathon for racial justice. 

This was an epic marathon of short interactive talks from students and recent graduates pushing the boundaries in anti-racism in Aotearoa and internationally. 

Most of the open-access webinars are now available online, where they are a permanent resource for anti-racist activism and Te Tiriti education. 

The organisers are a group of Māori and Tauiwi with experience in activism, research and community development. With your help, we hope that Te Tiriti-based Futures + Anti-Racism will continue  to be a biennial event.

Huriana Kopeke-Te Aho artwork.png

Huriana Kopeke-Te Aho
designed this beautiful logo an
d artwork. 

Te Rau Ora supported the commissioning of this taonga.

PREVIOUS YEARS' WEBINARS

All Videos
He Kōrero Papatupu Whenua: Land Stories webinar
58:28

He Kōrero Papatupu Whenua: Land Stories webinar

He Kōrero Papatupu Whenua: Land Stories 8:30am Thursday 21 March Kaikōrero: Dr Arapera Ngaha, Prof Jeannine Hill Fletcher Ringa hāpai: Stu McGregor Dr Arapera Ngaha: Reconciling injustices that occurred through colonisation with land ownership is one area that the Methodist Church of New Zealand: Te Hāhi Weteriana o Aotearoa has focussed on in seeking to address injustice in the context of Aotearoa. This has allowed us to focus on a Māori theology of land and speak to the land that our churches own and which they have owned for many, many years. Researching the history of acquisition has meant not only researching archival materials, but also engaging with local iwi, hapū and hearing their stories. Where injustice is identified as part of that acquisition, a second level of discussion and exploration is required, how best can we ‘the church’ address the injustice and reconcile with the original owners? This has been the discussion that informed our process of Kōrero Papatupu Whenua (Land Story Telling) and is the subject of this work today. Prof Jeannine Hill-Fletcher: In the United States, the project of ‘reconciliation’ will require an analysis of the illegitimate-yet-legal means by which ownership of land was claimed by White Christians. In this long historical project, the Church played a distinct role through an underwriting theology that promoted White Christian ownership. Further, White Christian churches and universities have held onto the illicitly-gained land on which their institutions have been built. Thus, for reconciliation to move forward, a thorough truth-telling must first take place whereby institutions of Church and School reckon with distinctive histories and chart specific commitments to reparation. Guided by the work of Indigenous scholar Maria Yellow Horse Brave Heart, and Christian leaders Duke Kwon and Gregory Thompson, Jeannine Hill Fletcher will share some of the framing issues that theologians in the United States are developing as resources to pursue this work. Out of respect for our kaikōrero and ringa hāpai, we have not translated karakia, pepeha from Te Reo Māori to English. This webinar was part of the Te Tiriti-based Futures + Anti-racism open access, online conference, 16-25 March 2024. #TBF2024 www.tiritibasedfutures.info
Anti racism interventions in Australian Schools webinar
01:23:03

Anti racism interventions in Australian Schools webinar

Anti-racism interventions in Australian Schools 11:30am Tuesday 19 March Kaikōrero: Prof Kevin Dunn, Dr Öznur Şahin, Katie Cherrington, Rachel Sharples Ringa hāpai: Karena Way Racism and racial bullying remain prevalent in Australian schools. The Speak Out Against Racism (SOAR) Project, conducted in government schools in NSW and Victoria in 2019, found that one-third of students experienced racial discrimination by their peers (31%) and within society (27%), and just over one in ten students (12%) reported racial incidents involving their teachers. At the same time, there is a growing recognition of the importance of building awareness of systemic racism and privilege to build support for anti-racism more broadly. Bystander anti-racism programs, especially during the formative years of young people, play a critical role in educating them to become engaged citizens who deeply value diversity, equity and inclusion in society. The AntiRacism in Action (ARiA) program, which we developed in collaboration with the NSW Department of Education, is specifically for students in Year 5 and 6 in NSW schools. The program included a co-designed curriculum with bystander antiracism activities, training videos and professional development training for teachers. The Department’s evaluation of the program showed that teachers reported increased confidence in teaching about racism and anti-racism after the training and using the curriculum resources. Nevertheless, we acknowledge that there is limited research on the impacts of anti-racism training interventions, and even less on what effect they may have on addressing structural racism. To enhance this program, we are co-designing a curriculum centred around structural anti-racism interventions and will conduct an evaluation of its long-term impact. Out of respect for our kaikōrero and ringa hāpai, we have not translated karakia, pepeha from Te Reo Māori to English. This webinar was part of the Te Tiriti-based Futures + Anti-racism open access, online conference, 16-25 March 2024. #TBF2024 www.tiritibasedfutures.info
Aotearoa New Zealand Histories: Diving into a Contested Past webinar
01:00:49
Asian relationships with Te Tiriti o Waitangi: Titiro whakamuri, kōkiri whakamua webinar
01:02:13

Asian relationships with Te Tiriti o Waitangi: Titiro whakamuri, kōkiri whakamua webinar

Asian relationships with Te Tiriti o Waitangi: Titiro whakamuri, kōkiri whakamua 10:00am Saturday 23 March Kaikōrero: Lincoln Dam, Dr Saburo Omura Ringa hāpai: Dr Clive Aspin Asian communities have a long association with Aotearoa, with some Indian and Chinese people settling here as early as the 19th Century. Demographic projections suggest that Asians will soon outnumber Māori in Aotearoa and will comprise more than a quarter of the overall population by 2043 (Stats NZ, 2022). Despite this long history and our (Asian) growing number, talk of Te Tiriti o Waitangi often centres on Māori and Pākehā relations. In this session, we reflect on our doctoral research - completed 10 years apart - on Asian relationships with Te Tiriti. Saburo revisits his 2014 research findings and reflects on what has changed since. Lincoln explores what Asian meditations on relationality and ethics can teach us about be(com)ing tangata Tiriti (people of Te Tiriti). This session invites other (Asian) im/migrants to consider how their communities can honour Te Tiriti o Waitangi and be(come) tangata Tiriti. See also: Lincoln Dam (2023) Be(com)ing an Asian tangata tiriti, Kōtuitui: New Zealand Journal of Social Sciences Online, 18:3, 213-232, DOI: 10.1080/1177083X.2022.2129078 Lincoln Dam (2023) Be(com)ing an Asian tangata tiriti, Kōtuitui: New Zealand Journal of Social Sciences Online, 18:3, 213-232, DOI: 10.1080/1177083X.2022.2129078 Out of respect for our kaikōrero and ringa hāpai, we have not translated karakia, pepeha from Te Reo Māori to English. This webinar was part of the Te Tiriti-based Futures + Anti-racism open access, online conference, 16-25 March 2024. #TBF2024 www.tiritibasedfutures.info

BIG THANKS TO OUR 2024 PARTNERS